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Gulf of Saint Lawrence

Every location in the world is unique and amazing. So many fantastic cultures and people fill these locations.

Because the earth is seventy-one percent (71%) water, most of these locations involve a body of water.

It may be an ocean or a lake, it could be a pond or a river, possibly a stream or even a puddle. No matter what type of water body, there are many facts to be learned.

One amazing body of water is the Gulf of St. Lawrence. If you would like to learn more about the Gulf of St. Lawrence, this is the place to be.

Keep reading to learn some amazing facts about the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

Gulf of Saint Lawrence Facts for Kids

  • The Gulf of St. Lawrence acts as the outlet for the Great Lakes of North America to the Atlantic Ocean.
  • The Gulf of St. Lawrence is approximately ninety-one thousand (91,000) square miles.
  • There are a total of ten (10) provinces in Canada and half of the border the Gulf of St. Lawrence. They are Nova Scotia. New Brunswick, Labrador, Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec.
  • There are several bays that branch out from the Gulf of St. Lawrence. This includes Fortune Bay, St. George’s Bay, Bay St. George, Bay of Islands, Miramichi Bay, and Chaleur Bay.
  • The first documented European explorer to to navigate the Gulf of St. Lawrence was Jacques Cartier in the year 1534.
  • One-quarter of the world’s freshwater, including the Great Lakes, is drained by the Gulf of St. Lawrence.
  • The Gulf of St. Lawrence has multiple national parks along its shores. This includes Mingan Archipelago National Park Reserve, Gros Morne National Park, Cape Breton Highlands National Park, kouchibouguac National Park, Forillon National Park, and Prince Edward Island National Park.
  • An area named as St. Paul Island at the northeast tip of Cape Breton Island is often referred to as the “graveyard of the Gulf”. This is because of the many shipwrecks that are still there. Access to the island is restricted and is controlled by the Canadian Coast Guard.
  • There are several rivers and streams that empty into the Gulf of St. Lawrence. This includes Humber River, Miramichi River, Romaine River, Margaree River, Saint Lawrence River, Restigouche River, and the Natashquan River.
  • Long before the arrival of the Europeans to the Gulf of St. Lawrence, First Nations people used the area for fishing and transportation.
  • The fish stocks of the Gulf of St. Lawrence have been heavily impacted by commercial fishing. The species that have been the most impacted include sturgeon, herring, and salmon.
  • There are major concerns for the Gulf of St. Lawrence due to the pollution, oil spills, untreated water waste, boat spills, and the influx of invasive species such as the zebra mussel.

 

Question: What is the average depth of the Gulf of St. Lawrence?

Answer: Four hundred and eighty-six (486) feet.

Question: What did Jacques Cartier name the Gulf of St. Lawrence?

Answer: The Country of Canadas’ which was derived from the First Nations word for “village”.

Question: Where does the Gulf of St. Lawrence enter the Atlantic Ocean?

Answer: The Cabot Strait, the Strait of Canso, and the Strait of Belle Isle.

Question: What is the name of the channel located on the floor of the Gulf of St. Lawrence?

Answer: The Laurentian Channel

Question: How deep is the Laurentian Channel?

Answer: Approximately nine hundred and fifty (950) feet.

The Gulf of St. Lawrence is a truly fascinating place to learn about. It has such a rich history and culture in the surrounding land. Hopefully, you have learned something new by reading this!