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Lincoln Memorial Facts

Lincoln Memorial is a memorial to honor the 16th President of the United States. It is located on the west end of the National Mall in Washington DC, across from the Washington Monument, near another famous monument called “The Reflecting Pool.”

The architect was Henry Bacon, and it was constructed between 1914 and 1922.

The building is made of white Georgia marble with inscriptions in granite and bronze on all facades below the cornice line and around all four sides near ground level.

Lincoln Memorial Facts for Kids

  • The monument honors Abraham Lincoln, the 16th U.S. President.
  • It measures 188 feet wide and almost 80 feet tall. 
  • The Statue of Lincoln weighs 170 tons
  • The monument is on the western end of the National Mall in Washington D.C.
  • Lincoln Memorial is a national memorial in the United States
  • The building has 36 columns, one for each state, which was a part of the Confederacy during the Civil War.
  • The Gettysburg Address of Abraham Lincoln is inscribed on the north wall of the museum.
  • There is also a mural depicting an angel freeing a slave.

Design

The idea behind the design was to make the memorial look like the Greek Temple of Zeus at Olympia.

The designer behind the sculpture of Lincoln was Daniel Chester French (April 3, 1850 – October 7, 1931) was an American sculptor ​and co-founder of the men’s Art Guild (which later became the National Sculpture Society);  French was born in Exter, New Hampshire, to Henry Flagg French, a lawyer, and Mary Kenrick French.

Statue of Lincoln

  • Its total weight is 170 tons.
  • It is 9.1 meters (30 feet) tall from the ground.
  • Lincoln’s seated figure is 5.8 meters (19 feet) tall.
  • Lincoln is seated on a pedestal that is 3.4 meters (11 feet) high.
  • At the back of the chair is a flag of the United States.
  • It took four years to complete.
  • The statue’s width and height are the exact same
  • The white marble was broken into 28 separate pieces before being shipped.

History of the Lincoln Memorial

The Lincoln Memorial is one of the most iconic structures in Washington D.C., and it is the site of many ceremonies held by presidents and other world leaders.

The memorial was built to honor Abraham Lincoln because he is one of the most influential figures in U.S. history, and his preservation of the nation is seen as a significant event in U.S. history.

On December 13, 1910, Congress passed its sixth bill authorizing the construction of the memorial. Lots of bills had been proposed since Lincoln’s assassination, but none of them had been passed.

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The design was selected from among a number of different designs submitted. The memorial, originally called the National Lincoln Memorial, was to be built in what is now Constitution Gardens near the United States Capitol building.

Some people initially questioned Henry Bacon’s architecture.

Some thought that a temple would not be appropriate since Abraham Lincoln’s personality was so humble. So they proposed to build a simple shrine out of log cabins. The log cabin design was considered because Lincoln’s roots were in Kentucky and days of logging in the 19th century.

William Howard Taft led a commission charged with building the monument. He later became the chief justice of the Supreme Court of the United States.

In the beginning, the government allocated $300,000 for the construction to begin in 1914. Lincoln’s son Robert, who had previously headed the fundraising committee, requested an additional $500,000 from Congress, which they granted.

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Abraham Lincoln’s two most famous speeches are engraved in the memorial. Gettysburg Address and second inaugural address.

The interior of the memorial consists of three areas. The main chamber holds the tall statue of Abraham Lincoln.

There are 87 steps leading to Lincoln’s statue. The number 87 refers to a phrase Abraham Lincoln uses in his famous Gettysburg Address  ‘four score and 7’.

On the south side of the building are photos of Abraham Lincoln.

It was finished on time despite the many changes during its construction.

In 1922, Commission President William H.Taft dedicated the Lincoln Memorial in Washington and gave it to U.S. President Warren G. Harding. He accepted it on behalf of the American people.

The only surviving son of President Lincoln attended the ceremony.

There’s a picture of the Lincoln Memorial on the back of a five-dollar bill.

A March on Washington was led by Martin Luther King, Jr. on August 28, 1963. His “I Have a Dream” speech ended the march at the Lincoln Memorial.

Unfortunately, there is a typo on the wall after all the skills work in carving this historic monument. Somebody made a little mistake and carved the letter “E” instead of the letter “F” for the word “Future” on the north wall. I hope they didn’t get into too much trouble

More than 6 million people visit the Lincoln Memorial every year.

Frequently Asked Questions

How old is the Lincoln Memorial

The Lincoln Memorial is approximately 100 years old.

How many steps does the Lincoln Memorial have

There are 87 steps leading to Lincoln’s statue.

How long did it take to build the Lincoln Memorial

It took eight years to complete the Lincoln Memorial.

Can you go inside the Lincoln Memorial

Visitors may visit the Lincoln Memorial 24/7 despite the fact that park rangers are only available between 9:30 a.m. and 10 p.m. The evening hours are ideal for a stroll along the grounds and quiet reflection.

Can you swim in the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool

Swimming in the Reflecting Pool is forbidden.

Are all 50 states on the Lincoln Memorial

Lincoln died in 1865, so the 36 columns represent the states of the Union at the time; the 48 stone festoons represent the 48 states in 1922.

Where is the hidden face in the Lincoln Memorial

If you look closely, there is a hidden face in this sculpture. For decades the legend has existed ever since a person noticed his back from behind while staring at a certain side angle. People now notice what appears to be Robert E. Lee’s face protruding outward against a back wall.